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The late CARMINE INFANTINO (1925 - 2013) was born May 24, 1925 in New York City. In 1942, Carmine worked for Timely Comics (later Marvel) and several different publishers. At the ripe old age of 19, Infantino finished his studies and went to work for DC.

At DC, he first worked on characters such as Johnny Quick and the Shining Knight, then editor/ publisher Sheldon Mayer put Carmine on the Golden Age Flash. Carmine ran with the assignment, until the book was abruptly cancelled. But years later, DC editor Julius Schwartz wanted to revive the Flash, so in 1956, Carmine redesigned Flash's costume for the landmark. Showcase #4. Then, in February 1959, the Flash title was finally revived, continuing the original numbering. Carmine took over the book -- he would illustrate it for almost two full decades.

During this period, Infantino also drew Adam Strange, the Elongated Man, the Justice League, Detective Chimp, and zillions of other characters. Oh, and he also created the "new look" Batman beginning with Detective Comics #327, reversing the title's alarming lack of popularity. Can you imagine ... Batman? Unpopular? Yet at the time it was all too true.

In 1967, Infantino became DC's editor in chief, and under him the company took several bold steps to revive sales. At this time, DC was a relatively "safe" comic company, publishing "family" type stories. No Vertigo imprint in these days! Marvel characters were more contemporary, cutting-edge and "hip." One of the many great things Infantino did was to bring artist Neal Adams to DC. Adams, of course, helped .revolutionize the entire comic book industry.

Carmine was appointed publisher of DC in 1971, and DC regained a top spot in the publishing business. In 1974 Infantino became president of DC. After a dispute with corporate heads of the parent company, the sometimes-abrasive Infantino zeta-beamed out of DC Comics in 1976, returning only for a brief run on Flash, and a handful of other occasional special issues. Infantino, 85, currently resides in Manhattan.

I hope you enjoy this special "ALL INFANTINO ISSUE" of DIAL B for BLOG!


Golden Age Infantino

Flash Comics #90, 92 and #103, original series -- -- ALL by birthday boy CARMINE INFANTINO.

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DC house ad for
Golden Age Flash Comics:
"Nine Empty Uniforms"


This Golden Age ad promoted Carmine's early Flash story. It says, "The game was won by Nine Empty Uniforms. How was it done?" I suspect Flash's super-speed had something to do with it. (The color cover of this issue is pictured above left.)


Silver Age Infantino


Showcase #4 introducing the Silver Age Flash; Detective Comics #329 featuring the "new look" Batman; and Flash #123, the epic "Flash of Two Worlds."


 
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"How I draw The Flash"
by Carmine Infantino


Wow -- who knew it was this easy! Or at least Infantino makes it LOOK easy. A classic in the "from rough to finished drawing in three easy steps" field! Click the pic or here for a big version.


Evil twins -- by Infantino

Mystery In Space #74 by Infantino/Giella; Detective Comics #3 by by Infantino/Giella; and Flash #139 by Infantino/Andserson.

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Flash and Elongated Man -- by Infantino

A page of original art from Flash #112 by Carmine Infantino. This issue introduced Ralph Dibney as the Elongated Man, then-newest in a long line of bendy superheroes that stretches all the way back to Plastic Man. Elongated Man's wife, Sue, would later ... oh never mind. It's too sordid. Click the pic or here for a big version.


Wild and whacky Infantino

Gorilla baseball in The Brave and the Bold #49; an iron bat in The Brave and the Bold #69; and giant fireflies in Mystery In Space # 67.

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Kid Flash gets a new uniform -- by Infantino


An Infantino-drawn panel from the Flash, featuring the debut of Kid Flash's new uniform, currently worn by Impulse, now calling himself Kid Flash. I think that's right.

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Marvel Infantino

Yes, Carmine also worked for Marvel! The Man Called Nova #21; The Avengers #203; and Star Wars #23, inked by Bob Wiacek.

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"The Amazing World of Carmine Infantino"

From Amazon.com: "The Amazing World of Carmine Infantino offers a fascinating first-hand history of American comics, from its infancy to the formation of a thriving industry-all through the eyes and experiences of a living legend. During his unprecedented 60-year career, Carmine Infantino has held nearly every job there is in the field of comics.
As a young freelancer, he contributed to comics' Golden Age with memorable renditions of Green Lantern, Flash, Airboy, and the Heap. Later, he became an architect of DC comics' Silver Age with his co-creation of the new Flash and other science fiction-themed comic books.
In 1964, he became indispensable to the Batman legacy, revitalizing the Caped Crusader with the "new look" Batman. Ascending the corporate ladder, Carmine was first Editorial Director, then Publisher, and ultimately President of DC Comics.
After leaving DC Comics, Carmine went on to teaching as well as animation and comics work. A treasure trove of incredible artwork, as well as a wonderful source of personal anecdotes from a legend in the field, The Amazing World of Carmine Infantino offers a rare insider's view of the comics industry that will fascinate comic lovers everywhere. Includes introduction by comics industry leader Joe Kubert."


Classic Infantino

Mystery in Space #90 inked by Murphy Anderson; The Brave and the Bold #72 also inked by Anderson; and Flash #350, inked by Klaus Janson -- last issue of the original, JayGarrick/Barry Allen, series!

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