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ISSUE NO. 812
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As we mentioned in our last issue, when former editor Dick Giordano started working for DC Comics, he revived the company's long-defunct title, All-Star Western with new characters: Outlaw and El Diablo. We'll begin a spectacular multi-part series about that devil in our next issue. But this time, we're talking about OUTLAW!

The debut OUTLAW story, written by Robert Kanigher and drawn by Tony De Zuniga, looked nice enough, but the story was not particularly memorable, nor was the character himself. Let's take a look...

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Despite the promise made in the blurb-ad above, Outlaw's next appearance was NOT "searing." Nor were any of his other apperances, with the exception of his cover appearances which, courtesy of Neal Adams, actually WERE somewhat searing.
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ABOVE and BELOW: All-Star Western #4, cover by Neal Adams. I mean, duh. I know you know these things, reader, but I write them for any "civilians" reading the site, which actually happens far more often than you might believe. Many times, people come here to LEARN about comics.
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However thing picked up a bit when western-comic veteran Gil Kane took over the character for an issue. Seen below is a page from ASW #4's lead story, featuring Outlaw, by Kanigher and Gil Kane.
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Impressive double-splash page, a rarity at this time!
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As we mentioned in our last issue, following a blow-out argument with Carmine Infantino, Dick Giordano, who had revived All-Star Western, quit DC Comics.

After Giordano left the company, the titles he had edited, including The Creeper, Hawk and Dove, and All-Star Western, were reassigned to other editors. Joe Orlando got custody of All-Star Western, beginning with issue #6. The book's "new sheriff" road into town full of innovative ideas, and ready to stir things up.
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KID ORLANDO TAKES THE REINS


"When I inherited ALL-STAR WESTERN from Dick Giordano," Joe Orlando once said, "I wanted to try a few things. The first was Billy The Kid, and that failed -- which could be because (the twist at the end of the first story is that) the hero turns out to be a girl, and readers resented that."

"Little boys don't like their heroes kissing girls in westerns and they especially don't like their heroes when they turn out to BE women." (Joe Orlando interview in Amazing World of DC Comics #6).

According to the letter column in ASW #8, when Joe Orlando took over as editor, he decided to conclude the Rick Wilson Outlaw series quickly, so he could replace it with his new female Billy the Kid series.

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ABOVE: Joe Orlando and his mentor, Wally Wood in a cartoon by Wood.
At this point, readers had no idea what to expect from the book, so, for continuity's sake, the "Outlaw" logo continued to appear prominently on the covers of issues #6-8, even though the new female Billy the Kid was the lead feature. Well, she WAS an outlaw, after all.
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In October 1970, following a blow-out argument with Carmine Infantino, Dick Giordano quit the company. The titles Giordano had edited, including The Creeper, Hawk and Dove, and All-Star Western, were reassigned to other editors.

Joe Orlando
got custody of All-Star Western, beginning with issue #6. The book's "new sheriff" road into town full of innovative ideas, and ready to stir things up.

But Dick got the last laugh. After he had already left DC, a "new" (Diana Rigg knock-off) Wonder Woman story he drew was published in Wonder Woman #203. In this story, the villain is named "Phillip Grandee."

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As you can see in the panels above, Dick drew Grandee as
a dead ringer for Carmine Infantino.
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All-Star Western #5 (original cover art by Neal Adams pictured below)
was the last issue of the title edited by Dick Giordano.
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Neal Adams' stunning original art for this cover (pictured above) was screened to achieve a grainy effect. The prited piece crowded out Adams' affectionate "in joke" of writing J. Orlando Manufacturing on the wall above Outlaw.
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Jim Aparo rode into town to guide Outlaw to a permanant residence on boot hill with the character's final story, in ASW #5...
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The story moves along very quickly, and then, kinda out of nowhere,
it concludes the entire series... rather abruptly!
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XSo, that was THE END of Outlaw. And, as we mentioned in our last issue, following a blow-out argument with Carmine Infantino, Dick Giordano, who had revived All-Star Western, quit DC Comics and went to work with Neal Adams.

After Giordano left the company, the titles he had edited, including The Creeper, Hawk and Dove, and All-Star Western, were reassigned to other editors. Joe Orlando got custody of All-Star Western, beginning with issue #6. The book's "new sheriff" road into town full of innovative ideas, and ready to stir things up.

KID ORLANDO TAKES THE REINS


"When I inherited ALL-STAR WESTERN from Dick Giordano," Joe Orlando once said, "I wanted to try a few things. The first was Billy The Kid, and that failed -- which could be because (the twist at the end of the first story is that) the hero turns out to be a girl, and readers resented that. Little boys don't like their heroes kissing girls in westerns and they especially don't like their heroes when they turn out to BE women." (Joe Orlando interview in Amazing World of DC Comics #6).

According to the letter column in ASW #8, when Joe Orlando took over as editor, he decided to conclude the Rick Wilson Outlaw series quickly, so he could replace it with his new female Billy the Kid series, which soon disappeared from the pages of All-Star Western forever. Boo hoo. Goodbye to two horrible characters.

Rest in peace, Outlaw and Billy the Kid!


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A devil of a time!
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