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NO. 788 - BONUS FEATURE
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BONUS FEATURE!
ROBERT WILLIAMS

Robert Williams was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico on March 2, 1943. In 1963 he began taking classes at Los Angeles City College, and contributing artwork to the school's newspaper. After graduating, he had trouble finding work -- until the manager of the local unemployment office hooked him up with a local business.

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"They told me that the freak that ran it was some guy called Big Daddy and I said, ‘Wait a minute, would that be Ed Roth?’ They said it was, and I said, ‘Let me at it. I was born for this job.' "
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Roth's shop was filthy, with car parts everywhere. Williams fit in like a glove, and never looked back. “Every day something amazing would happen. In the morning Sam the Sham and the Pharaohs’ recording group could walk in, and few minutes behind them would be Sonny Barger and some [Hells] Angels.”
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Taking over for Ed Newton, Williams' early work for Roth consisted of creating monthly advertising, graphic design, and elaborate hot rod projects such as The Rat Fink and Peace Fink. But as the artist found his own unique style, he began drawing nudes and violent scenes that eventually found their way into his work for Roth.

Pictured below, a Williams ad forRoth featuring skulls, snakes, decapitated heads, an even DEATH itself, clad in a black robe with a scythe (lower right).
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Big Daddy warned Williams repeatedly that they were creating products for the mass market, and such themes were inappropriate. Better to stick to cars and finks.
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Roth loved Williams' crazy, wild characters, including a satire of Superman (with an RF on his chest to avoid using DC's trademarked "S" logo).
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...and even a skull with an Iron Cross was good...
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but this little baby, original art by Williams from 1965, containing full female nudity and an outrageous anti-social message, was they type of thing that could get Roth in real trouble with distributors.
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Williams once said, “[Ed] sees me as a pornographer, and I see him as kind of a religious zealot. We’re very, very good friends, and he’s been like a father to me. But he still sees me as this unchaste person who misused his talent to hurt young people.”
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Mustanger by Robert Williams for Roth Studios.
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Williams left Roth after working with him for four years. He continues in the art field to this day. Three of his paintings are pictured below.
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"A White-Knuckled Ride for Lucky St. Christopher"
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"Cowboys and Amoebas"
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"Snuff Fink"
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Click PLAY below to see a two-minute excerpt from "Robert Williams: Mr. Bitchin," a 2013 documentary. You'll hear comments from Ed Roth, and halfway through, Williams makes a revealing statement regarding Ed Newton and Rat Fink.

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TIME TO SPILL THE BEANS!
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AND COMING SOON
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