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CHAPTER ONE
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Hello reader! Welcome to a new multi-part DIAL B for BLOG series revealing the secret origins of the Amazing Spider-Man. This blockbuster series will change the way you look at Spider-Man forever. That's a tall order, I know, but as usual, I'm going to make it even taller. Because before we're done, we're also going to change the way you look at Marvel Comics forever!

If you're a longtime fan, you know I am not lying. If you're new here, and you're wondering who the hell I am and how anyone could possibly do all that, let me explain. It's actually quite simple. My name is Robby Reed, and I have a dial.
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The secret origins of the Amazing Spider-Man begin with THE SPIDER, Master of Men, secretly detective Richard Wentworth (pictured above on the cover of the Spider #95). The character debuted in “The Spider Strikes,” Oct. 1933, cover shown below left. This story was credited to R.T.M. Scott, but with Spider #3, "Wings of the Black Death" (Dec. 1933, pictured below right), “Grant Stockbridge” took over writing chores, and the character went from being an imitation Shadow to being... well, the Spider!

The Spider didn't just kill his enemies... he killed them in GREAT numbers, and with near-fanatical enjoyment. As all Spider-fans know, “Grant Stockbridge,” was a pen name used by main Spider writer Norvell Page, as well as Emile C. Tepperman, Wayne Rogers, Prentice Winchell, and Donald C. Cormack.

The Spider was featured in two serials from Columbia. The first was The Spider's Web (1938), starring Warren Hull as the Spider. In this serial, Hull wore an entirely new costume that had never been seen before in the Spider pulps, complete with full face mask and flowing, spider-webbed cape. Here it is, on the cover of Screen Thrills Illustrated #8...
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Steve Ditko once recalled how Stan Lee tried to come up with a name for a new superhero.
"Stan said he liked the name Hawkman, but DC had the name and the character," DItko said.

"So I went down the list," Stan Lee continues. "Fly-Man didn't sound that good. Mosquito-Man, I don't know. Bug-Man, Insect-Man, and I got to Spider-Man and somehow Spider-Man -- and also when I was a kid there was a pulp magazine called The Spider, Master of Men."

"[He] had absolutely nothing to do with spiders, but he was a guy who wore a mask sort of like the Spirit -- if you remember that -- and a hat and a coat and he went out and fought crooks, but they called him the Spider. And I read those things when I was about eight years old, and I thought it was so dramatic. So everything fell in place and I thought, I'll call him Spider-Man."

So, Stan knew DC already had a Hawkman, but I guess he didn't realize that DC also had a Spider Man! Not many people do. DC's Spider Man debut in House of Mystery, 1954. Fake cover below!
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Here's the (not very) amazing story of DC's Spider Man!
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Meet Mr. Weems -- a man fascinated with insects who want to add a rare "Spider Man" bug to his collection. He searches the world, and finally, one day...
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Weems shows his collection to a friend, and explains a bizarre theory...
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In the end, Weems is killed by a falling horse (don't ask), and as his body is hauled away...
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Uh, OK, maybe there's a REASON Stan Lee knew of DC's Hawkman, but never heard of DC's Spider Man. We close this chapter of the Secret Origins of Spider-Man with a fake cover depicting a meeting between Spidey (by Ditko) and Hawkman (by Murphy Anderson)...
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Time for Robby to rewrite the history books!
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