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Part 13 of an all-new 21-part series - Click here for part one!
APRIL 1963
Continuing our series on DC editor Mort Weisinger and Ira Schnapp's unique "Coming Super Attractions" ad campaign!

The ad below uses CSA's "new look" stripe format. Is it just me, or are the stories getting whackier and whackier? As if Super BABY wasn't enough, now there's Superbaby the SECOND to contend with! The story seems to reflect a child's concerns about new family members. So does the story in the middle box, about a new member of the Legion "family" -- Element Lad.

Element Lad, a blonde himbo in a pink uniform, is basically the most powerful superhero of them all. He can change any element into any other element. Basically, he's like a god. But strangely, he was never all that popular. Oh well. The third box, about a Phantom Zone story, is repeated from previous CSA ads.
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BELOW: Was this CSA ad a coloring MISTAKE or a coloring EXPERIMENT? It's the only CSA ad in the entire series where just a single box is colored. It MIGHT have been a mistake, but if you look at the next ad in the series...
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JUNE 1963
...you'll see that NONE of the boxes are colored! Since the logos ARE colored, we can assume this coloring scheme was done on purpose, as an experiment. This ad features one of my favorite stories, where Jimmy and Superman go to Kandor and become the original Nightwing and Flamebird. And in box three: the STUPID Superboy. But don't worry Johnny DC, it's only a temporary effect of red kryptonite.
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JULY 1963
This ad continues using the same (non) coloring scheme as the two above, but the images are far more dominant than previous all-type ads. Weisinger is constantly modifying, constantly experimenting, testing different combinations of type and images to find out what works best to sell comic books. That's all for this time, reader!
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XWay back in ye olden times, people used to listen to a device called "radio." There were many popular personalities on this "radio," but none were more popular than NBC's Fred Allen.

In 1940, Fred Allen interviewed Superman creator Jerry Siegel and Harry Donenfeld, publisher of National Allied Publications, the future DC Comics. This rare interview gives us a chance to hear the voices of two key men behind the Superman legend!

It's highly-scripted and produced like a mini radio drama, so don't expect the super boys to attack Donenfeld for treating them poorly or stealing Superman away from them. Still, it's an interesting blast from the past. Click the play button below to hear the 11-minute, 15-second interview.
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That's all for this installment of COMING SUPER ATTRACTIONS.
See you next time, reader!

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