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HortonTHE DOCTOR IS IN!

Dr. Seuss was born Theodor Seuss Geisel in Springfield, Massachusetts, on March 2, 1904. His father was a brewmaster. His mother used to sing him to sleep with rhymes, planting the seeds which would grow into Giesel's many rhyming stories.

After graduating from Dartmouth in 1925, he went to Oxford and met Helen Palmer, whom he wed in 1927. Upon his return to America later that year, Geisel published cartoons and humorous articles in major magazines such as Life, Vanity Fair, and Liberty.

Geisel wrote his first children's book, "And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street," in 1936. He created the elephant character HORTON for 1940's "Horton Hatches the Egg." During World War II, Geisel joined the Army and was sent to Hollywood, where he created an Oscar-winning Hortoncartoon titled "Gerald McBoing-Boing."

After his first wife died in 1967, Giesel married Audrey Stone. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 1984 and three Academy Awards, Geisel authored and illustrated 44 children's books. Theodor Geisel aka Dr. Seuss passed away on September 24, 1991.

SECRET ORIGINS of
THE CAT IN THE HAT and HORTON

In 1954, Geisel's publisher sent Geisel a list of 400 words he felt were important for children to learn. The publisher asked the author to cut the list to 250 words and use them to write an entertaining children's book. Nine months later, Geisel, using 220 of the words given to him, published The Cat in the Hat.

How did "Horton Hears A Who!" come about? During World War II, Giesel's drew numerous political cartoons demonizing the German and the Japanese wartime leaders. Pictured below are three World War II era cartoons by Giesel, who signed them using his famous "Dr. Seuss" pen name.
Seuss cartoon
Seuss cartoon
When the war ended, America launched the ambitious Marshall Plan, aimed at reconstructing war-torn Europe. Some in the USA opposed this plan, but Seuss was not among them. A great humanitarian, Seuss decided to use the elephant character from "Horton Hatches The Egg" (seen below, left) in a new story, "Horton Hears A Who!" (seen below center and right in different editions).
Horton
"Horton Hears A Who!" was Dr. Seuss' way of reminding post-war America that "A person's a person, no matter how small." Now let's take a look at this wonderful children's story, followed by some special "Horton" fun and games!
"HORTON HEARS A WHO!"
Horton Hears A Who
Horton the elephant hears a noise coming from a dust mote in a flower!
Horton Hears A Who
Within the tiny dust mote exists the world of the WHO's!
Horton Hears A Who
No one believes Horton. They think he's crazy!
Horton Hears A Who
But then the WHO's combine to make enough noise to be heard!
Horton Hears A Who
Moral of the story: "A person's a person, no matter how small!"


Stop searching for Ray Palmer...
Horton Hears A Who
FUN "WHOVILLE" ACTIVITIES!
Horton Hears A Who

Horton Hears A Who

Horton Hears A Who
The video version of HORTON!
Horton Hears A Who
Horton, as envisioned by the great Chuck Jones!
Horton Hears A Who
Horton Hears A Who


Dr. Whovee by Chuck Jones!
Dr. Hoovey
Horton Hears A Who
HORTON Movie Preview
Finally, here are some scenes from the new computer-animated "Horton Hears A Who!" movie, starring the voices of former "Grinch Who Stole Christmas" Jim Carrey, Steve Carell of NBC's "The Office," and legendary TV comedienne Carol Burnett.
Horton Hears A Who
Horton Hears A Who
Horton Hears A Who
Horton Hears A Who
Horton Hears A Who
Horton Hears A Who
Horton Hears A Who
Horton Hears A Who

Horton Hears A Who


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SON O GOD

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