DIAL B for BLOG
NEW ISSUE ARCHIVES BOARD FAQ LINKS CONTACT ADVERTISE

GNUHOPPER, CREATOR OF UNIVERSE DESTROYER LAD AND
WINNER OF THE REJECTED LSHer CONTEST, HAS CHOSEN TODAY'S STAR...
.
The fantastic Forbush Man, Marvel's parody hero of the 1960s and sometime star of Not Brand Echh comics, was not the first superheroic satire to wear red longjohns -- far from it! Before we get to Forbush Man, let's take a stroll down memory lane and have a look at the OTHER red long underwear-wearing heroes in comicdom! There are more of them than you may think, and they go waaaay back to the Golden Age of comics. The very first one, who wore red longjohns as well as a steel pot for a helmet, was the inspiration for Forbush Man. Here SHE is... the Red Tornado!

MA HUNKLE aka THE RED TORNADO - 1940
Sheldon Mayer was behind the scenes at the launching of the first superhero, Superman. The first superhero team, the JSA, was probably his idea. Mayer also created the first superhero parody in comic books -- Abigail "Ma" .Hunkel, aka the Red Tornado.

In All-American Comics #20 (Nov 1940), after a relative hit a longshot at the racetrack, Ma used the winnings to buy a neighborhood Grocery Store. When a protection racket threatened the store, Ma became “The Red Tornado” -- the first hero parody to wear red flannel long-johns as a costume. She concealed her identity by cutting eyeholes in an old pot and using it for a helmet.

As the Red Tornado, Ma attended the first meeting of The Justice Society of America, but was prevented from joining by an unfortunate accident -- she tore her pants on a nail, and had to beat a hasty retreat.

In All-American #23, Red Tornado became the official co-star of the series, now called "Scribbly & the Red Tornado." The character remained in the book until #59 (July, 1944). Ma Hunkle is currently the manager of a museum devoted to the JSA.
(Adapted from Don Markstein's Toonopedia)
.
Ma appeared with the original Justice Society of America in All-Star #3...
.

SUPERSNIPE - 1942
Supersnipe, the boy with the most comic books in America, was actually a boy named Koppy McFad. Koppy loved his comics -- he read 'em, breathed 'em and slept 'em. He wanted to be a superhero himself -- so, like the Red Tornado, he sometimes put on red flannel long underwear with a cape and mask, and .went forth to right wrongs throughout his neighborhood.

Supersnipe was sometimes referred to as "The Man of 1953," a satire on Superman's nickname "The Man of Tomorrow." 1953 was the year Supersnipe would reach manhood. In his mind, of course, he wasn't a 10-year-old in long johns, but a big, strong hero who could take on the worst villains in the world, even, on occasion, Hitler himself. Even in real life, he was often able to defeat petty criminals and other reasonable-size menaces.

Created by cartoonist George Marcoux, Supersnipe, debuted in Shadow Comics vol. 2 #3 (March, 1942), published by Street & Smith. Supersnipe also appeared in Army & Navy Comics #5, a minor and not very successful magazine. With its sixth issue (October, 1942), Army & Navy's title was changed to Supersnipe Comics. Marcoux continued to handle the series, although later issues were often written by Ed Gruskin, who also wrote the comic book version of Doc Savage for Street & Smith.

Koppy and his alter ego remained on the comics scene much longer than most of the superheroes that inspired him. But toward the end of the decade, the majority of costumed crime fighters had faded away, and Street & Smith let its comic book activities fade away too. The final issue of Supersnipe Comics was vol. 5 #1 (Aug-Sept 1949).
(Adapted from Don Markstein's Toonopedia)
.
.
.
SUPERSNIPE #310 (1947) SUPERSNIPE #405 (1948) SUPERSNIPE #501 (1949)

GOOFY as SUPER GOOF - 1965
.Walt Disney’s Goofy was once a costumed hero! Super Goof first appeared in “The Phantom Blot Meets Super Goof” (1965) written by Del Connell. In it, Goofy accidentally drank a cup of super fuel produced by Gyro Gearloose and imagined that he had acquired super powers.

Costuming himself using an old potato sack as a cape and his own red long underwear for a uniform, Super Goof went off in pursuit of the Phantom Blot. He didn't actually have super powers... yet. Super Goof’s second origin story appeared in Donald Duck #102. This time, Gyro manufactured a special cape that provided the bearer with real super powers.

In the first issue of Super Goof’s own title, in yet another origin story titled “The Thief of Zanzipar,” Super Goof got powers from Super Goobers -- special peanuts that somehow had found their way to Goofy's backyard.

In “The Great Big Super Goobers,” it was disclosed that the original peanut which started Goofy's garden came from Mexico, where it was grown by a hero called Superior Senior. Disney’s “Super Goof” was published from 1965 to 1984 (#1-74).
(Adapted from Wikipedia)
.
.
.
SUPER GOOF #1 SUPER GOOF #30 SUPER GOOF #40

CAPTAIN KLUTZ - 1967
.Don Martin’s Captain Klutz first appeared in 1967, at the height of the Batman TV craze. He debuted in a paperback book from Signet Books that contained all-new material. Martin did all the artwork and is credited with some of the scripting, with some writing by Dick DeBartolo, Phil Hahn and Jack Hanrahan.

Captain Klutz’s secret identity was Ringo Fonebone. As a child, Ringo read Brap Man, The Blue Blockhead, Babboon Boy, and other comic books, leaving him with little aptitude for normal human activities. One day, Fonebone accidentally foiled a bank robbery while wearing a “superhero” suit of red longjohns.

Stricken with temporary amnesia, Fonebone accepted the foiled robber's assessment of him. When the police captain asked who he was, Fonebone replied, "I'm … I'm … a klutz, captain …" The policemen dubbed him Captain Klutz. With the able assistance of Police Chief O'Freenbean, Captain Klutz went on to face Sissy Man, Mervin the Mad Bomber, Comrade Stupidska and many other menaces to law-abiding people everywhere.

Don Martin left Mad in 1987, and passed away in 2000. Since the Captain Klutz character was jointly owned by Martin and EC Publications, that ended the possibility of more Captain Klutz stories.
(Adapted from Wikipedia)
.
.
.

HERBIE as THE FAT FURY (1967)
.
Herbie Popnecker was created by Shane O'Shea (pen name of writer Richard E. Hughes) and artist Ogden Whitney, was published by American Comics Group (ACG) starting in 1958.

The Herbie character first appeared in Forbidden Worlds #73, in "Herbie's Quiet Saturday Afternoon" (Dec. 1958). In May 1964, Herbie got his own title. The origin of the Herbie as the Fat Fury appeared in Herbie #8 (March, 1965), a story covered in Dial B for BLOG #104.

The Plump Lump, as he was called -- mostly by his disappointed father -- had an origin story was called "Make Way for the Fat Fury!" Below are three cover showing Herbie as the Fat Fury (FF did NOT appear in every issues of Herbie, but in every other issue.)
.
.
.
HERBIE #12 HERBIE #14 HERBIE #16

AND NOW, FINALLY, OUR STAR IN RED LONG-JOHNS...
FORBUSH MAN!
FORBUSH MAN COVER GALLERY ONE

.
.
.
NOT BRAND ECHH #1 NOT BRAND ECHH #5 NOT BRAND ECHH #8

AT LAST!! IN RESPONSE TO OUR CONTEST WINNER'S REQUEST, WE PRESENT...

.
.
.
.

.


FORBUSH MAN COVER GALLERY TWO

.
.
.
NOT BRAND ECHH #9 NOT BRAND ECHH #12 CRAZY #1 (Reprints "Not Brand Echh")
FORBUSH MAN MEETS THE MARVEL VILLAINS!
.

FORBUSH MAN MEETS NICK FURY!

.

FORBUSH MAN MEETS THE X-MEN!
.

AND FINALLY, FORBUSH MAN MEETS... THE BEATLES?!?!
.
FORBUSH MAN -- MARVEL VALUE STAMP #101
.
"When we started working on the Marvel Legacy: 1970s Handbook, we were looking for things that captured the essence of '70s Marvel - the return of horror, some cheesy villains, there was glam, there was angst, there was F.O.O.M., there were the little boxes with the floating heads in the top left corner of the covers, and there were .Marvel Value Stamps. Personally, I never was a page-snipper, but I certainly remember those little colorful squares.

We knew we wanted a classic '70s character never previously profiled on a stamp. Handbook writer Michael Hoskin suggested we go with Stamp #101, and use Forbush Man from the cover of Not Brand Echh #5 by Marie Severin (pictured left).

I did three backgrounds. First. I tried a "faded 1970s comic book black" but it looked a bit drab. Next was purple to retain the night-time moonlit mood. Then I tried one more tweak. with a dot-pattern to resemble the primitive printing processes of past publishers! (Take that alliteration, Stan Lee!)

Handbook editor Jennifer Grunwald found a home for it on the "Where are they now?" page, and the rest is history. I'm really proud of that stamp, and I hope everyone bought two copies of the book -- one to preserve, and one to read under the sheets at night by flashlight... with a little square snipped out of the back cover!"

--Mike Fichera, Author of The Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe


THE EVER LOVIN' END!
COMING NEXT

.



POST YOUR COMMENTS BELOW!