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SECRET ORIGINS OF SWING WITH SCOOTER - CONCLUSION
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IDENTITY CRISIS!

Scooter had begun life as an American Paul McCartney, but a third of the way into his 36-issue run, he was "Archi-fied," and his comic book was transformed into a virtual clone of the "Archie" line.

Even the ginchy original Scooter logo was redesigned to look almost exactly like Archie's logo, then later revamped again to the version seen on the covers below. Stick an Archie head over Scooter's head, and these gag covers could easily be mistaken for issues of "Archie's Pals 'n' Gals."

Who IS Scooter? A British singing expatriate? A typical, all-American teenager? A shockingly obvious Archie rip-off? The strange answer is that Scooter has actually been ALL of these things, and that's enough to give a comic character an identity crisis -- one that has nothing to do with Dr. Light!
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SCOOTER #22 SCOOTER #23 SCOOTER #24
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Like Scooter, Binky had also undergone the painful process of "Archi-fication." As you can see from the covers shown below, Binky, star of "Leave It To Binky," started out as a clean-cut, Doby Gillis type, then gradually became "hipper," and finally ended up as just another Archie clone. The "Binky" logo mirrors the transformation of the "Scooter" logo, which was also made Archie-like, then later redesigned to be more pointy.
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LEAVE IT TO BINKY #51 LEAVE IT TO BINKY #61 LEAVE IT TO BINKY #71

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SCOOTER #25 SCOOTER #26 SCOOTER #27
Above, three "Swing With Scooter" covers by underrated cartoonist Henry Scarpelli. Once you get over how different the Scooter character looks from his original incarnation, you can begin to appreciate Scarpelli's work for what it is. If you want to fault someone for Archi-fying Scooter, then fault DC, not Scarpelli. I'm sure it wasn't HIS idea to make Scooter into Archie, and you have to admit... the man can cartoon! Below, from "Swing With Scooter" #27: Malibu's strangest moment?
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SCOOTER #28 SCOOTER #29 SCOOTER #30
Back in the days when comic publishers thought it was possible to make teenagers more polite by serving them up propaganda disguised as entertainment, DC liked to run occasional pages offering tips to teens. Below, from "Swing With Scooter" #28, Scooter's "Aunt Hatta" -- a character who was, no doubt, inspired by the Batman TV show's famous Aunt Harriet -- "Tells It Like It IS!" Only question: Who's going to tell AUNT HATTA?
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DEBBI - SCOOTER - BINKY • PIN-UP 1971 CALENDAR
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THE SWINGING CAT
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"Swing With Scooter" #32
saw the addition of a new character to the Scooter-verse... Penny's Cross-Eyed Pussycat! This character may have been intended to be an answer to the then-popular TV cartoon .Josie And The Pussycats, which was based on an Archie comic book (seen right).

In "Josie," there was a character named Alexandria who had a cat called Sebsatian (see Josie and the Pussycats #106 cover at right, and blow-up pictured left). They were even more similar to Penny and her Cross-Eyed Pussycat than it seems -- both cats had MAGICAL powers.

It appears DC decided that Scooter wasn't Archi-fied enough, so they decided to copy an Archie spin-off character's PET. But still, I actually LIKE the Cross-Eyed Pussycat. I think he's cute. Forget about Alexandria's Sebastian -- obviously, the Cross-Eyed Pussycat was the sensational character find of 1971...
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Penny's "Cross-Eyed" Pussycat debuted in "Swing With Scooter" #32. The cat couldn't talk, and although it had magical powers, it actually it never really did much of anything, except look cute and be madly in love with Batman. He also had a "magic tail." Pussycat was often seen reading the latest issue of "Batman" while emitting love-hearts over his head (as seen on the fake cover above, a parody of Detective Comics #38, which introduced ROBIN to the world!)
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SCOOTER #31 SCOOTER #32 - 1st Pussycat SCOOTER #33
Below are a few pages from "Swing With Scooter" #33, showing how the evil witch who was the cat's original owner tries to steal it back from its new owner, Penny, by pretending to be the Pussycat's idol, Batman.
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Later, the Pussycat escapes the witch, and returns to Penny's house, its new home...
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EXTREMELY TRIVIAL TRIVIA: The Cross-eyed Pussycat turned up in Plop #21 (June 1976), as seen in the page below contributed by DIAL B for BLOG reader Comic Reader Man!
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What is "fun"? For those of you who may have been wondering what "FUN" is, here's a DC house ad for "Swing With Scooter" #35 that tells you EXACTLY what fun is...
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"Swing With Scooter" #35 was cover-dated August 1971, and it may have been what "FUN" is because it guest-starred Superman! Sylvester finds Superman's costume and pretends to BE Supes to impress the gang. As seen in many an old Lois Lane plotline, Superman secretly protects Sly so he won't look foolish.

During this time period, DC had Murphy Anderson re-doing the faces on Jack Kirby's Superman to match the look he & Curt Swan had in the regular Superman titles. In the panels below, you can see the half-hearted attempt by Stan Goldberg and Henry Scarpelli to mimic SwAnderson on Clark Kent. But then, later in the story, Supes' face and figure get pretty rough-looking. (Thanks to DIAL B for Blog fan "Comic Reader Man" for the scans!)
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SCOOTER #34 SCOOTER #35 SCOOTER #36 - FINAL ISSUE!
"Swing With Scooter" #36 was Scooter's last issue -- and was published in October 1972, more than a YEAR after the previous issue. Why so long between issues? Who knows. But when Scooter and company finally did return, it seems the company knew that this would be Scooter's last gasp, and attempted to bring two of the series' running plots lines, such as they were, to a climax. First came a final nod to the superhero who had been associated with Scooter almost from the beginning-- Batman! Here are two panels from "Swing With Scooter" #36, featuring the famed Bat-Signal. Malibu's comment is priceless...
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And finally, here's the last time Scooter was seen in his own title, from "Swing With Scooter" #36. In this issue, Scooter and Kenny do what was considered very "uncool" for budding hippies at the time -- they get jobs! And not only that, but as kicky Kenny is seen admitting to Penny and Cookie in the panel below, "It's not as bad as I though it would be!"
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After this, Scooter disappeared, never to be seen in the DC Universe again, except for a brief cameo on the cover of Animal Man #24 by Brian Bolland, pictured below. The upper right-hand corner of "Swing With Scooter" #1 is clearly visible among the pile of comic books on the floor of Psycho Pirate's asylum...
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.And so ends the epic saga of "Swing With Scooter." The title had a good run -- 36 issues, published from July 1966 until October 1972. Identity crisis? Believe it or not, "Swing With Scooter" lasted as long as Jack Kirby's "New Gods" (11 issues) .and "Mister Miracle's" 25 issues -- combined!

Not bad for a crazy mixed-up kid who can't even decide if he's original or Archie, American or British. So I, Robby Reed, creator of this blog and author of this article, have a message for you reader -- weep not for Scooter!

Born under the shadow of the Beatles, Scooter flew to America to find himself. Together with Malibu, Cookie, Penny and the rest of his groovy groupy, he rose to hobnob with superstars and superheroes. From battling invading Martians, to portraying Hamlet, to being transformed first into a vegetable, then into Archie, Scooter had his glory days, and their memory is enough to keep him warm in the chill DC limbo where he now resides. Long may he live. Long may he swing! Long live... SWING WITH SCOOTER! Yeah yeah yeah!
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THE END!
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