DIAL B for BLOG
NEW ISSUE ARCHIVES BOARD FAQ LINKS CONTACT ADVERTISE
.
SECRET ORIGINS OF SWING WITH SCOOTER - PART 6 of 8
SCOOTER SCOOPS!

Inspired by Paul McCartney, with a supporting cast based on Archie characters, Scooter took the comic scene by storm starting with his first issue, cover-dated July 1966. We've shown the cover and pages from Scooter's debut in previous installments of this Dial B for Blog series, so we'll start with "Swing With Scooter" #2 as we examine the title issue by issue. These early Scooter stories were written by Jack Miller and Barbara Friedlander, and mostly penciled by Joe Orlando with inks by Mike Esposito (at least until Mark Evanier says otherwise!). It's time for Scooter Scoops, which, not coincidentally, was also the ginchy name of the "Swing With Scooter" letters page...
.
And as you'll see, reader, that title is justified, because this issue of Dial B for Blog breaks the biggest scoop of Scooter's career -- guaranteed! To start things off, here's a DC House ad for "Swing With Scooter" #2, featuring a Hulk parody named "Zekefreak." We saw Zekey earlier in this series. The black and white house ad below ran on the inside front and back covers of various DC books in 1966.
.
.
.
.

.
.
.
SCOOTER #3 SCOOTER #4 SCOOTER #5
The third issue of Scooter featured "Action At The Auction," and "Happiness Is A Haunted House," seen earlier in this DBB series. Scooter #4 (above, center) featured "I Was A Teenage Martian's Bride -- Almost," with a Martian on the cover (no relation to J'onn J'onzz) who was in love with Cynthia, Scooter's ginchy sister. This issue also had one of my favorite Scooter stories, "Election A Go-Go!" In this one, the gang tricks their teachers by holding a "Faculty Popularity Contest." As Sylvester explains it...
.
.

.SCOOTER SCOOP: True Brit?

"Swing With Scooter" #5 featured "Yo, Ho, Ho, And A Bottle Of Root Beer," a treasure-island spoof, and also "A Day In The Life Of Scooter," a back-up story which contained a bombshell revelation that has gone unnoticed by comicdom for almost 40 years. Allow me, Robby Reed, creator of this blog and author of this article, to point it out!

It was only Scooter's fifth issue, but in it, we were told that Scooter wasn't British after all, but "a typical average American who quit a successful English singing group." It must be true, because Scooter explicitly says so himself -- TWICE! Wow. If this story is to be believed -- and there's no reason it shouldn't be -- Scooter wasn't British after all!

No WONDER he never used a deranged British version of the awkward "slang" DC's teenagers usually spoke in the Silver Age. It seems our Scooter has been an American all along! Who knew? Here are the relevant panels from the story...
.
.
You heard him! It looks like Scooter isn't British after all, and never was! STOP THE PRESSES!
.
Talk about Scooter scoops! Moving right along, "Swing With Scooter" #7 was a "comedy of terrors," at least according to the DC house ad shown below.
.
.
.
.
SCOOTER #6 SCOOTER #7 SCOOTER #8
"Swing With Scooter" #6 had the gang performing Hamlet, plus the Beatles-inspired backup story, "Money Can't Buy Love." In Scooter #8, the gang got the shrinking treatment. In-between came "Swing With Scooter" #7, my favorite Scooter Story of all time, titled "The Mad Scientist Who Hated Little Red Riding Hood," or "Goldilocks-- Get lost!" In this wild and crazy tale, Scooter and group are changed into vegetables. And I don't mean they become mindless, I mean they're changed into actual vegetables! I don't believe that ever happened to Archie and company. Here's how it went down...
.
.

.
.
.
SCOOTER #9 SCOOTER #10 SCOOTER #11
Swing With Scooter #9's cover shows the Scoot-man asking his supporting cast, "Hi, Groupy! What's cooking?" This misuse of the term "groupy," which actually meant a chick who idolizes a rock group, highlights DC's misbegotten attempts to invent new teenage slang terms. For Scooter, "groupy" meant "his peer group." Foremost among DC's new slang was the grimace-inducing "zipsville," the Scooter-verse equivalent of "no way." At any rate, the book-length story in this issue was called "A Frog Named Boris."

Swing With Scooter #10 has "The Day Sylvester Fell Out Of His Tree," where miserly Sly seems to starts giving everything he owns away (gasp!) -- but don't panic, it's only in hopes of winning a "Most Generous Teenager" contest (whew!). Plus, the girls battle over Scooter in "Luv Sick," page shown below.
.

Swing With Scooter #11 (pages below) featured "I Was A Teenage Teenager!" In this story, pages shown below, Scooter and group try out to be in a Hollywood movie. The film's star, Miss Dolores Del Knight, comes to Scooter's high school to personally select her extras, and the cast goes wild. It went down like this...
.
.



SPECIAL MINI-POSTER! Scooter's Hip Humor - art by WALLY WOOD!
.
Here's a final Scooter scoop... the book was a bi-monthly! That's right. So the issues of "Swing With Scooter" showcased in this edition of Dial B for Blog represent the title's first TWO YEARS of publication! And as you can see, Scooter's supporting characters, though they may have been partially based on Archie's cast, weren't really handled like them at all in practice. Nor were the early stories totally humor-oriented -- they were mostly romantic teen adventure dramas with a comedic spin!

The first two years had been a blast for Scooter and his "groupy" -- but change loomed around the corner. The Golden Age of "Swing With Scooter" was about to end... and Scooter's entire universe was about to undergo a radical alteration. What would stay the same? ZIPSVILLE!

CLICK HERE FOR PART SEVEN

SCOOTER GAINS A NEW LOGO and A NEW ARTIST
...BUT LOSES EVERYTHING THAT MADE HIM UNIQUE! READ...

THE DECLINE AND FALL OF SCOOTER!


POST YOUR COMMENTS BELOW!