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.PART THREE OF THREE
CANCELLED COMIC CAVALCADE #2!

The following editorial appeared in "Cancelled Comic Cavalcade" #2, a photocopy collection of then-unpublished DC inventory material featuring mostly books cancelled in the "DC Implosion" of 1978:

A SECOND EDITORIAL, OF SORTS

If you missed the breathtaking editorial in the first xerox-packed issue of CANCELLED COMIC CAVALCADE, go back and read it. We've got your names and addresses and we'll be sending you a test.

The contents:

Kamandi #60 and #61
(OMAC back-up feature)
Prez #5
Shade The Changing Man #9
(Odd Man back-up feature)
Showcase #105 featuring Deadman
Showcase #106 featuring The Creeper
Secret Society of Super-Villains #16, #17
Steel #6

The Vixen #1
COVERS FOR: Army at War #2, Battle Classics #3, Demand Classics #1 and #2, Mister Miracle #26, Ragman #6, Weird Mystery #25 and #26, Western Classics #1 and #2.

The editor would like to thank Neil of the Magic Finger deep down at Warner Duplicating who keep the spirit of Plop! alive when Paul Kupperberg came down with about a ream of original art and asked for 35 collated copies. Neil's hat actually flew off his head, and when he fell stiff-backed straight backwards, an audible "Plop!" sound was to be heard. And for those of you who missed our last exciting indicia:

CANCELLED COMIC CAVALCADE, Vol. 1, No. 2, Fall 1978, published twice in a lifetime by DC Comics, Inc., 75 Rockerfeller Plaza, New York, N.Y., 10019. Copyright © 1978 DC Comics Inc. All Rights Reserved. The stories, characters, and incidents mentioned in this publication are entirely fictional. No actual persons, living or dead, are intended or should be inferred. Printed in the U.S.A. Jenette Kahn, Publisher; Joe Orlando, Managing Editor; Mike Gold, Editor/Packager; Paul Kupperberg, assistant Editor/Packager; Jack Adler, Vice-President/Production; Vince Colletta, Art Director; Paul Levitz, Editorial Co-Ordinator, Sol Harrison, President; Arthur Gutowitz, Treasurer. SUBSCRIPTION DEPARTMENT: Annual subscription rate: $7.65 (couldn't sell any at last issue's rate). Upon cancellation of this publication, all subscriptions will convert to Freedom Fighters, which will convert to Secret Society of Super-Villains, which will convert to Justice League of America, which, if cancelled, will most likely convert to a revived issue of Cancelled Comics Cavalcade. Only West German Marks accepted as payment for subscriptions to this publication.

KAMANDI and OMAC!
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KAMANDI #1 - 1972 KAMANDI #29 - 1975 KAMANDI #59 - 1978
Kamandi, a boy adrift in a post-apocalyptic, Planet of the Apes-like future, was named after a sign in his origin story that read "Command-D." The longest-lasting of Jack Kirby's DC titles, Kamandi was finally cancelled with issue 59. Below is the cover for what would have been Kamandi #60, drawn by Rich Buckler and Jack Abel. (This Kamandi story, titled “Into the Vortex,” was written by Jack C. Harris, with art by Dick Ayers and Danny Bulanadi. The OMAC back-up story was by Jim Starlin!)
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Kamandi #60 would have introduced a new back-up feature in the book, starring OMAC, the "One Man Army Corps." Here's the last page from that OMAC story, drawn by Jim Starlin!
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PREZ -- FIRST TEEN PRESIDENT!
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PREZ #1 PREZ #2 PREZ #3
Prez, First Teen President, was another zany creation of Captain America co-creator Joe Simon. The book ran just four issues. Prez #5 would have featured a story titled “The Devil’s Exterminator,” about Prez fighting an army of insects attacking Washington. Below is the cover of Prez #5, by Jerry Grandenetti and Creig Flessel.
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SHADE THE CHANGING MAN and THE ODD MAN!
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Shade the Changing Man, created by Steve Ditko, first appeared in June 1977. Who was Shade? His full name was Rac Shade of the planet Meta, and he stole an "M-vest" which enabled him to project a huge but bizarre version of himself. Shade lasted eight issues before being cancelled. Below is the cover to what would have been Shade the Changing Man #9, featuring Shade in “The Deadly Ally” by Steve Ditko and Michael Fleisher.
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The Odd Man, another Ditko creation, was detective Clayton Stoner of River City. (Dude, he said STONER!) When Stoner dons a bizarre, patchwork suit and rubber mask, he becomes The Odd Man! Odd Man fights crime with his tilting headquarters, extending tie, smoke gloves, and special sprays. The Odd Man story slated for Shade #9, with OM fighting the reincarnation of a Nile Queen, was intended to be the first of a continuing backup series -- but then the entire book was cancelled. The Odd Man story was eventually printed in Detective Comics #487 (Jan. 1980).
SHOWCASE!
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DC revived their old Showcase title in 1977, and two issues were written and drawn when the title was cancelled. The first, which would have been issue #105, starred Deadman in “Requiem for a Deadman,” written by Len Wein and Gerry Conway, with art by the late Jim Aparo. This story was printed in Adventure Comics #464, minus two pages where Deadman saves a boy who is chasing his cat on a building ledge. Here's the would-be cover of Showcase #105, by Jim Aparo:
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Showcase #106 would have featured "Enter Dr. Storme," with Steve Ditko returning to his creeping creation, the Creeper, who was covered in DIAL B for BLOG #251. Here's Ditko's unpublished cover, followed by a page from the story.
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The Deserter, slated for the next three issue of Showcase, was discussed in part two of this Secret Origins series by me, Robby Reed, the author of this article and creator of this blog. (HA! You didn't think I was going to forget to say that, did you reader?) Next, Showcase #110-112 would have featured "The World of Krypton." Because Showcase was cancelled, "World of Krypton" was turned into a three issue mini-series in 1979 -- the first ever mini-series in comic book history!
SECRET SOCIETY OF SUPER VILLAINS!
The Secret Society of Super Villains was cancelled with #15. Here's the cover of what would have been issue #16, showing, as the blurb says, "12 super villains, 3 Justice Society members, plus all 7 Freedom Fighters." The story was written by Bob Rozakis, and the unpublished cover (seen below) was penciled by Alex Savuik and inked by Dick Giordano.
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STEEL!
Before John Henry Irons, there was another Steel named Hank Heywood. Created by Gerry Conway and Don Heck, this Steel, "The Indestructible Man," debuted in March 1978. Hank Heywood was a fatally-injured Marine whose body was entirely rebuilt out of steel. His title lasted five issues -- below is what would have been the cover of Steel #6 by Don Heck. (The story for this issue was eventually printed, with alterations, in All-Star Squadron #9.)
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THE VIXEN!
The Vixen is a lady fox! DC must have wanted to make sure you remembered that, reader, because it's practically part of the book's logo. Created by Gerry Conway with Carla Conway, Vixen is super-model Marilyn McCabe, whose father was murdered. After discovering a necklace that activated her mystical powers, McCabe became Vixen, a lady fox, and got her revenge. The story's final caption reads: "THE END…AND THE BEGINNING." Vixen finally made her official debut three years later, in Action Comics #521. Here's the aborted cover of The Vixen #1, drawn by Bob Oskner and Vince Colletta, followed by the story's splash page.
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RAGMAN!
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Ragman is a creation of Robert Kanigher and Joe Kubert. Like his creators, Ragman is Jewish -- one of the very few Jewish superheroes (Ben Grimm aka the Thing is another). The character was recently revived as a member of the Shadowpact team. Ragman's title lasted five issues, below is what would have been the cover to Ragman #6, by Kubert.
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DEMAND CLASSICS!
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FLASH #123 ADVENTURE #352 ADVENTURE #353
Demand Classics, an all-reprint title, would have reprinted great old DC stories. The first issue was scheduled to reprint the landmark Silver Age story "Flash of Two Worlds," from Flash #219. The second issue was to reprint the Legion of Super Heroes tales revolving around a doomed team member. "One of the Legionnaires on this cover will DIE!" It turned out to be Ferro Lad, who could change himself into solid iron. Below is the cover of Demand Classics #2, spotlighting "The Ghost of Ferro Lad." Let it haunt your dreams until Robby's NEXT Secret Origins series.
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EPILOGUE
Following the fabled "DC Implosion," Jenette Kahn was fired, right? Wrong. She was promoted from Publisher first to President, then to Editor-in-Chief! And, as previously mentioned, when the one-time creator of Kids and Dynamite magazines retired in 2002, she was acclaimed by the company as “the driving creative force behind the growth of a small comic book imprint into the multi-billion dollar home of some of the most recognized iconic characters in the world.”

What did Kahn do that was so great? The Dark Knight Returns; The Watchmen; Camelot 3000; The New Teen Titans, The Death of Superman; Morrison's JLA; The Killing Joke; Crisis on Infinite Earths; and every other DC comic book published during Jenette Kahn's epochal reign at DC. To steal a phrase from the competition... nuff said!
THE END!


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