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All-Star Comics #23 (Winter 1944): "Plunder of the Psycho-Pirate"
The original Psycho-Pirate made his first appearance in All-Star Comics #23 (Winter 1944), cover by Joe Gallagher pictured above. The Pirate gets his name from his attempts to manipulate and "pirate" the emotions of others. In "Plunder of the Psycho-Pirate," the Justice Society is summoned to the offices of the Daily Courier. It seems the newspaper has just received a threatening note...
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The bald guy is Daily Courier publisher Rex Morgan, the man with the mustache is Charles Halstead, a linotyper at the Courier and Morgan's friend. Making good on his threat, the Psycho-Pirate perpetrates a series of crimes based on emotions, and the JSA members try to prevent these crimes.

The Pirate uses LOVE as a weapon against Hawkman; attacks Starman with rampant HATE; terrorizes Dr. Mid-Nite with FEAR; plays on Johnny Thunder's CONCEIT; uses GREED against the Spectre; and almost makes Atom DESPAIR. But in the end, the JSA triumphs, and the Atom exposes Charles Halstead as the Psycho-Pirate!
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All-Star Comics #32 ( Dec.-Jan. 1947): "The Return of the Psycho-Pirate"
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The Psycho-Pirate escapes from prison in All-Star #32 (cover by Martin Naydel pictured above) with the help of his cellmate, "Big Mike" Carillo. Thanks to writer Gardner Fox, the JSA members battle Big Mike and the Psycho-Pirate as they try to commit another series of emotion-based crimes. Naturally the Justice Society wins, and the Pirate and Big Mike are sent back to prison... for good? Not hardly.

Unpublished All-Star Comics story (1946): "The Will of William Wilson"
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The Psycho-Pirate had an unpublished encounter with the Justice Society in story titled "The Will of William Wilson." In this story, created in 1946, the Psycho-Pirate, calling himself William Wilson, again fought the JSA. Roy Thomas' Alter Ego magazine featured a new cover for the story (pictured above), drawn by Mr. Monster 's Michael T. Gilbert. Alter Ego also located much of the tale's original art. Below are a few panels from "The Will of William Wilson," presented here in COLOR for the first time ever:
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Showcase #56 (May-June 1965): "Perils of the Psycho Pirate"
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.After spending years in prison, the Psycho-Pirate's health began to fail. He spent his last years researching emotions, and he eventually discovered the existence of the legendary "Masks of Medusa." These golden masks supposedly allow their owner to control the emotions of others. Did they really exist?

MEDUSA FUN FACTS: In Greek Myth, Medusa was one of the three Gorgons. She had snakes for hair, and the power to turn anyone who looked at her to stone. Perseus beheaded Medusa, and placed her head upon his shield (pictured right) because it still retained the power to petrify all who looked upon it. The head was later used as an apotropaic mask, a talisman which both killed and redeemed. So, there was NOT actually a set of golden, emotion-controlling masks. But sort of.

The dying Charles Halstead passed this information on to his latest cell-mate, a man named Roger Hayden, in Showcase #56 (cover pictured above). Here's how it went down:
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Hayden breaks out of jail, locates the fabled Medusa Masks, and absorbs their emotion-controlling powers. Then, donning a red and black costume decorated .with two small images of the Medusa masks -- coincidentially, also the classic theatrical symbols of comedy and tragedy pictured right -- Roger Hayden becomes the DCU's .second Psycho-Pirate (action figure pictured left).

Hayden soon encounters new Silver Age versions of two Golden Age heroes: The mystical Dr. Fate, and the Miraclo-powered Hourman. They mix it up with the Pirate, courtesy of writer Gardner Fox and artist Murphy Anderson.

Hourman is no match for the Pirate's emotion-controlling powers, but Dr. Fate is far too familiar with the Hypothalamus and Septal Region of the brain for the Psycho-Pirate to easily defeat him! Fate zaps a magic mask over the Pirate's face which robs him of his emotion-controlling powers. See below...
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The Spectre #5 (July-Aug. 1968): "Fugitive From Justice"
.The Psycho-Pirate made his final Silver Age appearance battling The Spectre, another former JSAer who had been resurrected and given his own title in November 1967.

In a story called "Fugitive From Justice" on the cover, and "The Spectre Means Death?" on the inside, the Pirate frees himself from the magic mask Dr. Fate placed over his face, then teams with Gat Benson, Jim Corrigan's murderer, to fight the Spectre. The Pirate manages to find the magic bullet the demon Asmodeus used to keep the Spectre imprisoned in Jim Corrigan's body for almost two decades. In the end, Spec prevails -- naturally (unnaturally?).

Below is a panel from the story, which was both written AND drawn by the one and only Neal Adams. It's some of Neal's earliest DC work, and a rare example of his writing abilities. Reader, I don't know about YOU, but just looking at this panel gets me all... emotional! See you tomorrow.
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BONUS! The Psycho-Pirate by Jerry Ordway, from the DC "Who's Who"
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