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.Christopher Reeve was born September 25, 1952, in New York City. When he was four, his parents -- journalist Barbara Johnson and writer/professor Franklin Reeve -- divorced. His mother moved with sons Christopher and Benjamin (pictured, with Christopher to the left of his mother) to Princeton, New Jersey, and married an investment banker a few years later.

Reeve traces his love of acting back to the early years of his childhood when he and his younger brother would climb inside cardboard grocery cartons and pretend they were pirate ships. "To us they became pirate ships, simply because we said they were."
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By age eight, Reeve had appeared in school plays, become interested in music, and was taking piano lessons. At age nine, he was picked to be in a Gilbert & Sullivan operetta Yeoman of the Guard for Princeton's professional theater, the McCarter Theatre. "While I was growing up," Reeve recalls, "I never once asked myself, 'Who am I?' or 'What am I doing?' "
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After graduating high school, Reeve toured the country as Celeste Holm's leading man in The Irregular Verb to Love, then went on to pursue a college education, although he continued to work simultaneously as a professional actor, "thanks to an understanding agent who'd set up auditions and meetings around my class schedule." As part of his studies at Cornell University, where he majored in Music Theory and English, he spent time studying theater in Britain and France.
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In 1976, Reeve went to Los Angeles and got a small part in Gray Lady Down. Back in New York City, he was in the off-broadway production My Life. During that .production, director Richard Donner cast Reeve as the lead in Superman The Movie (1978).

Reeve said he portrayed Superman as "somebody you can invite home for dinner. Someone you could introduce your parents to. What makes Superman a hero is not that he has power, but that he has the wisdom and the maturity to use the power wisely. From an acting point of view, that's how I approached the part."

The first Superman film was a gigantic hit, and Reeve later did three more films as the Man of Steel: Superman II (1980); Superman III (1983) with Richard Pryor; and the critically lambasted Superman IV: The Quest for Peace (1987).
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Reeve went on to appear in a total of 17 feature films, a dozen TV-movies, and about 150 plays. In addition, he hosted or narrated numerous documentaries and TV specials, many of which involved interests of his such as aviation or stunt work. In May of 1995, during an event in Culpeper, Virginia, Reeve's horse balked at a rail jump, pitching him forward. Reeve's hands were tangled in the horse's bridle. He landed head first, fracturing the uppermost vertebrae in his spine. As a result, Reeve became paralyzed from the neck down.
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Though paralyzed, Reeve did not give up. He became a real-life superhero -- a crusader for noble causes, determined to help others. He was named Chairman of the American Paralysis Association and Vice Chairman of the National Organization on Disability, co-founded the Reeve-Irvine Research Center in California, and created the Christopher Reeve Foundation in 1996. On May 3, 2002 the US government opened the Christopher and Dana Reeve Paralysis Resource Center. Christopher Reeve passed away while in coma after going into Cardiac Arrest on Sunday, October 10th. As much for his good works after his accident as before, Christopher Reeve will never be forgotten.